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Mary and Jane

Mary & Jane
Cannabis Grow Boutique

Mary And Jane is a boutique hydroponic supply store situated in Ballito KZN. We consult on,
stock and supply everything that you need to privately grow your legal cannabis for personal
use.

Our goal is to ensure that everyone – from new growers to large ops – has the opportunity to
grow the dankest bud possible. By providing you with the best products, equipment and expert
knowledge. Whether you are planning on growing indoor or outdoor, in organic living soil or
DWC hydroponics.

New to growing? Not a problem – our knowledgeable cannabis consultants are on hand to assist
you with setting up your grow and choosing the right products for your space.
We are proud to stock a wide range of market-leading brands used by cultivators worldwide
including General Hydroponics and Biobizz nutrient lines, Secret Jardin tents and LED lighting by
Horticulture Lighting Group.
Shop online www.maryandjane.co.za
Courier Nationwide
Our shop is located in 3 Coconut Grove, Shakas Head, Ballito, South Africa
Telephone: 072 439 7866
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G-Force Seed Company

The G-Force Seed Company
Start The Right Way

We bring you world famous award winning cannabis seeds from the best global seed breeders in the world. We want South Africa to be a greener place for all and give everyone the opportunity to grow their own world class cannabis right at home. All products are original products and shipped in its original packaging from the Western Cape
South Africa.

All products has already been imported and is ready to be delivered anywhere in South Africa.

Currently we deal with 12 international cannabis seed companies with plenty of products and seed pack sizes to choose from. We are in the process of adding more of the best seed companies in the world to our
selection soon. We hold a huge range of feminized seeds, autoflowering seeds, CBD seeds, regular seeds, bulk seeds as well as Industrial

Hemp Seeds.

Currently we deal with Barney’s Farm (the best in the world), Royal Queen Seeds, BlimBurn Seeds, DNA Genetics, Cali Connection, Sweet Seeds, Oasis Genetics, Canuk Seeds, Samsara Seeds and Prism Seeds.

Since we went online for the first time in July 2019 we delivered 100% successfully to many happy clients all over South Africa.

Buy your cannabis seeds with confidence and grow the best weed in the world at your own home.

Start the Right Way
The G-Force Seed Company

www.gforceseedcompany.co.za
info@gforceseedcompany.co.za
Like and follow us on FACEBOOK here. https://www.facebook.com/gforceseedcompany/

Check out our awesome promotional video on Youtube:

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cannabis influencer-marketing-south-africa

Cannabis influencers South Africa

Being a cannabis influencer on social apps like Instagram and YouTube can be lucrative. But creators say their accounts often get shut down by both tech platforms.

Business Insider spoke with three cannabis influencers who said they charge anywhere from $300 to $1,500 for a sponsored post.

Because of the threat of having an account on Instagram or YouTube shut down, these influencers said diversifying into other revenue streams like touring, merchandise, and consulting was important for cannabis creators.

Anjela G. didn’t plan on becoming a cannabis influencer. She discovered the potential for marijuana fame three years ago when she uploaded a photograph of herself holding a bong that was reposted by a bunch of cannabis meme pages. Anjela, who asked that her last name not be published for privacy reasons, then began posting skits and funny videos that helped her build an audience of hundreds of thousands of followers on social media.
“It started with pictures and taking bong rips,” she said. “I really just found a way to connect with so many people all over the world.”

Anjela’s cannabis-centered brand, Koala Puffs, has over 900,000 followers across Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, and Twitter. Because her content is all about using cannabis, a federally classified Schedule I drug in the US, her accounts are in a tenuous position on social platforms like Instagram and YouTube.

“Instagram deleted me seven times in 12 months,” she said. “I never really heard from them about why my account went down. I really don’t think I’m doing anything wrong, and then you wake up and your page is gone and you don’t know for how long.”

Anjela isn’t alone in facing uncertainty and confusion about the longevity of cannabis-themed accounts. Business Insider spoke with three other popular cannabis creators who all said their accounts had been shut down at various points by platforms like Instagram and YouTube.

Social-media platforms are navigating shifting laws and public opinion when it comes to cannabis content
Instagram and YouTube are still determining how to moderate cannabis content at a time when their users live across state and national borders where marijuana is subject to a wide variety of laws and regulations.

A creator who lives in California or Canada — where cannabis is available to adults for recreational use — can share content with a viewer in South Dakota or Sweden, where the plant remains illegal. Confusion on where to draw the line on what is and isn’t acceptable content may explain why creators like Anjela see their accounts intermittently shutdown for content violations and then restored.

Marijuana remains federally illegal in the US, but 11 states have legalized cannabis for recreational use. The Food and Drug Administration and Federal Trade Commission have recently been cracking down on how sellers of CBD, the nonpsychoactive form of cannabis, advertise and package their products. But the regulators have mostly addressed cannabis influencer marketing as they would any paid endorsement on social media.

The FDA’s most recent statement on cannabis marketing, which was updated last week, said “the agency is committed to protecting the public health while also taking steps to improve the efficiency of regulatory pathways for the lawful marketing of appropriate cannabis and cannabis-derived products.”

The FTC has focused on ensuring that any sponsored posts are “clearly and conspicuously disclosed” — its standard for all categories of influencer-based advertising — leaving questions of federal legality to the Department of Justice, said Sandy Lynskey, a lawyer who works in the advertising and cannabis, CBD, and hemp practices at the law firm Mac Murray & Shuster.

“If an endorser is compensated in any manner, that needs to be clearly and conspicuously disclosed, according to the Federal Trade Commission,” she said. “It doesn’t need to be written, exactly, it could be something that is stated. Oftentimes what is clear and conspicuous can become subjective.”
And beyond the FDA, FTC, and DOJ, the platforms themselves have their own standards.

A Facebook spokesperson said Instagram did not allow the advertising, sale, or promotion — including paid influencer posts, product integrations, and affiliate links — of marijuana. The company does allow “marijuana-advocacy content, and dispensaries can also promote the use and federal legalization of marijuana provided that they do not also attempt its sale.”

YouTube also doesn’t allow advertising on cannabis videos or videos that promote its sale.

When their accounts aren’t deactivated, cannabis influencers are well-compensated for sponsored posts and affiliate sales

While influencer marketing of cannabis falls in a regulatory gray area, some brands are happy to test the waters with popular creators in the category.

The US marijuana industry generates billions of dollars in sales annually, and cannabis brands are paying influencers handsomely to promote their products on social platforms.

Teresa Garibyan, who runs the popular cannabis Instagram account Trippy Treez, said she earns between $1,000 and $1,500 for a single sponsored post on her Instagram account, which has 223,000 followers. Like many cannabis influencers, she also receives free products as part of her compensation.

“I used to be in accounting,” she said. “I was doing that, and then I got a job offer to help out with trimming plants. At the time it was very illegal, and I just wanted to keep it super low key.”

In addition to working part time with a marijuana grower, Garibyan started posting cannabis content online and launched her Trippy Treez Instagram account in March 2016. She discovered she could earn a living from promoting and reviewing cannabis products and quit her accounting job to work full time as a cannabis influencer.

Like Anjela, Garibyan often finds herself under the scrutiny of Instagram’s content policies. She said her account was shut down for two months in 2018 and deactivated twice for shorter windows in 2019.
“2019 was a really bad year for cannabis users,” she said. “Everyone was deleted left and right. I know a lot of YouTube users got removed, but almost all of them got their pages back.”

YouTube didn’t honour a cannabis creator when he a hit follower milestone

While Instagram has recently become an important platform for cannabis influencers to reach new audiences, YouTube has long been a destination for marijuana creators looking to connect with fans.

Alex Arav began posting cannabis content on YouTube in 2011. He runs the account Lex Blazer, a verified YouTube channel with 168,000 subscribers that discusses cannabis culture, horticulture, and “legal developments/science around the plant,” according to the channel’s description.
“Initially I saw that there was nobody who was creating half-decent cannabis content on YouTube, especially in the horticulture segment of it,” he said.

Arav lives in British Columbia, Canada, where recreational cannabis is federally legal. But he said he still had his account deactivated at various points by YouTube and other social platforms.
YouTube closed his account in 2013, but he was able to reactivate it in 2014, he said. The platform frequently suspends his account for community-guideline violations related to his cannabis content, blocking him from uploading videos for weeks at a time, he said.
The company also decided not to award Arav the Silver Creator Award plaque, an honor given to creators who pass 100,000 subscribers. “Creator Awards are given at YouTube’s discretion, and only to creators that follow the rules,” the company told him in an email reviewed by Business Insider.

YouTube’s policy says it will “only recognize creators who follow our guidelines” and “reward creators who keep their accounts in good standing without copyright strikes or violations of YouTube’s Community Guidelines or Terms of Service.”

YouTube allows content that depicts cannabis use but applies age restrictions so videos are accessible for users above the age of 18 only. The company doesn’t run advertising on cannabis videos and will remove posts that feature “hard or soft drugs” that appear to have the goal of selling them.

Arav earns revenue from promoted content on his YouTube videos. He charges between $500 and $600 dollars for a sponsored product review and between $300 and $350 to include a “brought to you by” message from a brand at the start of a video. His account was demonetized for Google-placed ads — the way many YouTube influencers earn a living — because of the company’s policies around cannabis content.

“Other channels within my size range could make a couple thousand dollars if they’re ad-friendly,” Arav said.
“It’s actually been pretty crazy for various cannabis creators because YouTube has very unclear rules on this type of content,” he said. “My content is more educational. More about horticulture rather than stoner-type topics. YouTube has some allowances for educational-type content.”

Because he knows his account could be shut down at any time, Arav doesn’t rely on YouTube as his sole source of income. He posts videos on cannabis-friendly platforms like TheWeedTube, makes money trading stocks, and works casually as a commercial grower in British Columbia.

Diversifying into other revenue streams is important for cannabis creators who work full time as influencers
Because YouTube and Instagram deactivate cannabis accounts regularly, many creators in the space have found ways to earn revenue that do not involve the social platforms.

Arav earns about a third of his internet-based revenue from affiliate links to cannabis-centric products on Amazon. He set up an affiliate seller page, Lex’s Choice Grower and Head Shop, that he links to on his YouTube channel. Arav also runs a Patreon account on which subscribers can pay for one-on-one consultations about cannabis horticulture, and he makes a small amount of revenue from merchandise sales.

Garibyan said she was using her Trippy Treez’s fame to launch a CBD skin-care brand in the coming months. She also does social-media consulting for brands.

Anjela has moved beyond posting sponsored content on her Koala Puffs accounts to building a diversified business that includes touring and events, her own line of CBD gummies, and gigs in music and film — she was recently cast in a new comedy movie, “4/20,” and is releasing a single, “Smoking By Myself (feat. MacDizzle),” later this year.

“I’m in this for the long haul,” she said. “I have really big goals for businesses that I want to open, and it’s all long term.”

Who is your favourite South African cannabis influencer? Comment below.

Original article by Business Insider here.

 

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Eastern Cape government approves setting up of a cannabis college

cannabis college south africa

Cannabis College South Africa

In a move to develop, commercialise and remove stigma associated with dagga, the Eastern Cape government has approved the setting up of a cannabis college.

Although the details and other logistics are still being worked out, Rural Development and Agrarian Reform MEC Nomakhosazana Meth tabled the proposal in the provincial Parliament and it was agreed to.
“The provincial government has accepted the proposal. There is a lot to be put in place first, things such as the legislative framework, the licensing regime and removing longstanding stigma. A building has already been identified and it is awaiting the final legislative processes to be in place,” said Ayongezwa Lungisa, spokesperson for rural development and agrarian reform.

This follows South Africa’s realisation of the economic potential of the cannabis industry if it is properly regulated and the product is rescheduled as an agricultural crop rather than a drug as it currently is.

“The Eastern Cape government has taken a decision to support and facilitate legitimate production of cannabis in the province for the growth and transformation of its economy. Cannabis stakeholders in the province resolved that, among other things, the provincial government would facilitate investors and markets, support farmers with hemp permits, and assist in reviewing the South African cannabis legislation to support the production of cannabis,” Lungisa told City Press.

Meth has already engaged investors in Canada, which is one of the fastest-moving countries towards relaxing cannabis legislation and allowing for its commercial production.

Lungisa said Canadian investors had shown interest in investing in South Africa: “The investors committed themselves to opening processing plants, training farmers in growing and processing cannabis, and helping to market the final product. However, they want South Africa to have in place the right legal framework to start production.”

The provincial government will assist the farmers with, among other inputs, seed, fertilisers and fencing.

“The provincial government is planning road shows where information on cannabis will be disseminated to interested rural farmers, some of whom are already cultivating cannabis illegally.”

Experts say that, for South Africa to fully realise the economic benefits of the cannabis industry, dagga should first be reclassified as an agricultural crop and not as weed, which reinforces its stigma.

Agricultural economists say that the country should have a clear, sound licensing regime with a single authority that will make determinations about the various types of licences, such as for scientific and medicinal use, as well as dispensary and industrial hemp production.

“This would mean recognition of cannabis as an agricultural crop through rescheduling, as well as a key ingredient in medical use. It is important that South Africa has a simple, clear and predictable licensing regime that is aimed at promoting economic growth, competitiveness and economic inclusion,” said Wandile Sihlobo, chief economist at the Agricultural Business Chamber of SA, in an interview with City Press.

However, Nelson Mandela University economic professor Ronney Ncwadi disagrees: “There is a moral contestation about [cannabis] being wrong, so on that score it is going to be met with a lot of opposition from various retailers as well as nongovernmental and faith-based organisations that are anti-[cannabis], and which see it as a doorway to other drugs. If it does yield positive outcomes it will have social costs, so it depends if the social costs outweigh the social benefits,” he argued.

By Max Matavire. Original story appeared in the City Press here.

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Medical testing for cannabis in the mining sector

dagga testing south africa

Cannabis Testing in the South African Workplace

After the cannabis judgment handed down by the Constitutional Court in 2018, it is now widely known that adults may use, possess and cultivate cannabis privately in South Africa.

The judgment raises critical questions around medical testing in the workplace, especially at mines, where employees have to operate complex machinery and may endanger their own lives and those of others if their faculties are impaired.

Employers in the mining industry are obliged to maintain a safe working environment and may exclude employees under the influence of an intoxicating substance from entering the workplace or remaining at work.

Impairment caused

In general, when cannabis is smoked, the following occurs:

Impairment will start immediately and last for between 6-8 hours.

Duration of impairment may last longer if there are higher levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the cannabis used.

Other factors (lack of sleep, use of other medication, consumption of alcohol and other medical conditions) can increase the duration and level of impairment.

When it is consumed in other ways (e.g. ingesting through oils), its effect on the human body can differ, especially where certain cannabinoids are removed.

It can negatively impact on an employee’s occupational capacity in many ways, including:
performing tasks slower;
performing poorly when handling routine, monotonous tasks;
difficulty in multi-tasking;
difficulty in taking instructions;
difficulty in making crucial decisions (especially in high-risk situations);
difficulty in operating machinery and/or motor vehicles.

Practical difficulties with testing at mines

Traces of cannabis can be found in the human body for up to six months after use, so it is challenging to determine the extent of impairment (if any) after such a long time.

The purpose of the testing is to prevent employees who are under the influence of an intoxicating substance to enter the workplace to prevent safety risks.

If employees test positive for cannabis, they are not necessarily still influenced by it and may not present a safety risk.
If mining companies simply apply the zero tolerance policy (as with alcohol) to cannabis testing, employees may argue that they acted within the constraints of the cannabis judgment, they are not “under the influence” of cannabis (and therefore not a safety risk) and that they are treated unfairly in not being allowed to work and/or losing remuneration for that specific shift.

Difficulties may also arise when employees consume cannabis for medical reasons.

Will the employer’s health and safety obligations trump a possible discrimination claim by the employee who elects to use cannabis for medical treatment?

Some employees of mines do not work in hazardous environments and work strictly in an office environment. Consideration should be given whether the same stringent policy and testing mechanisms should be applied in non-hazardous areas.

Policy considerations

Employers in the mining industry should reconsider their current substance abuse policies. The following questions should be considered:

Is a zero tolerance policy on cannabis justified given the workplace/s?

How is it possible to test if employees are “under the influence” of cannabis and therefore constitute a safety risk as opposed to just having traces of cannabis in their bodies?

Should the policy be different for non-hazardous working areas?

In light of the cannabis judgment, it is necessary for cannabis to be regulated in its own section of companies’ substance abuse policies. The policy should also include a testing procedure and the circumstances under which testing will occur.

It may also be useful for to run an employee training programme on testing for cannabis. This will ensure that all employees are aware of the substance abuse policy and cannabis testing procedure.

Written by Lizle Louw and Shane Johnson, Employment Law Specialists at Webber Wentzel.

Original article by Mining Review may be viewed here.

 

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You should worry about leftover solvents in cannabis oil

Cannabis oil South Africa

Many cannabis producers have moved beyond using solvent extractions to isolate cannabinoids and other desirable compounds from cannabis plants. However, there are still plenty of concentrate products available that involve the use of hydrocarbons—such as butane and propane—ethanol, or carbon dioxide to pull THC, CBD, terpenes, and more from raw cannabis plants.

While efforts are made to remove these solvents, it’s likely that some amount will end up in the final product. In regulated markets, there are specified levels of solvents that are allowed in products sold or prescribed to consumers.

But when it comes to products that are not regulated, such as those sold illicitly, it can be difficult to know how much of a solvent remains. That’s why it’s always important to get your cannabis products from a legal, licensed store.
When consumed at high levels, these solvents could pose health risks, some of which aren’t entirely established. In this article we’ll look at the regulations surrounding residual solvents and the risks these substances might pose to human health as a result of overconsumption.

Restrictions on solvent levels
Knowing that the presence of some residual solvents in cannabis products is inevitable, relevant authorities impose limits on the levels allowed for each type of solvent.
Solvents are classified in three divisions: Class 1, 2, and 3. Class 3 solvents have low toxic potential and are the only ones recommended for use in the production of cannabis extracts. However, it’s possible that some Class 1 and 2 solvents can end up in final products, often as contaminants of Class 3 solvents. For example, benzene, toluene, and xylenes (known collectively as BTX) are found in natural gas, from which butane is sourced.
This explains why you’ll find some pretty harmful substances on residual solvent lists. For example, in Colorado, benzene, a Class 1 solvent, is allowed at a level of up to two parts per million (ppm).

Health implications of ingesting common solvents
The main solvents used in cannabis extraction are carbon dioxide, butane, and ethanol. When it comes to consumption, extracts are most often vaporized, via a vape pen or dabbing, but they can also be incorporated into edibles. Less commonly, extracts are smoked, for example, by topping a bowl with wax or dipping a joint in concentrate.  While residual carbon dioxide is not a concern, excess butane or ethanol could pose health risks, depending on levels and method of consumption.

Butane
Butane offers a relatively simple and inexpensive method to extract a large percentage of THC and other desirable compounds from cannabis plants. But it has been the subject of much controversy when it comes to what is considered a safe amount. Some naysayers argue that long-term consumption of butane by ingestion or vaporization has not been studied widely enough to confidently say it’s safe at any level.
Regulators appear to disagree and in many regions, butane is allowed at the seemingly high level of 5,000 ppm. However, illegal products could contain much higher levels.

Many cannabis producers have moved beyond using solvent extractions to isolate cannabinoids and other desirable compounds from cannabis plants. However, there are still plenty of concentrate products available that involve the use of hydrocarbons—such as butane and propane—ethanol, or carbon dioxide to pull THC, CBD, terpenes, and more from raw cannabis plants.

While efforts are made to remove these solvents, it’s likely that some amount will end up in the final product. In regulated markets, there are specified levels of solvents that are allowed in products sold or prescribed to consumers.

But when it comes to products that are not regulated, such as those sold illicitly, it can be difficult to know how much of a solvent remains. That’s why it’s always important to get your cannabis products from a legal, licensed store.
When consumed at high levels, these solvents could pose health risks, some of which aren’t entirely established. In this article we’ll look at the regulations surrounding residual solvents and the risks these substances might pose to human health as a result of overconsumption.

Restrictions on solvent levels
Knowing that the presence of some residual solvents in cannabis products is inevitable, relevant authorities impose limits on the levels allowed for each type of solvent.
Solvents are classified in three divisions: Class 1, 2, and 3. Class 3 solvents have low toxic potential and are the only ones recommended for use in the production of cannabis extracts. However, it’s possible that some Class 1 and 2 solvents can end up in final products, often as contaminants of Class 3 solvents. For example, benzene, toluene, and xylenes (known collectively as BTX) are found in natural gas, from which butane is sourced.
This explains why you’ll find some pretty harmful substances on residual solvent lists. For example, in Colorado, benzene, a Class 1 solvent, is allowed at a level of up to two parts per million (ppm).

Canada, where cannabis products were legalized across the country in 2018, has its own set of regulations.

Health implications of ingesting common solvents
The main solvents used in cannabis extraction are carbon dioxide, butane, and ethanol. When it comes to consumption, extracts are most often vaporized, via a vape pen or dabbing, but they can also be incorporated into edibles. Less commonly, extracts are smoked, for example, by topping a bowl with wax or dipping a joint in concentrate.

While residual carbon dioxide is not a concern, excess butane or ethanol could pose health risks, depending on levels and method of consumption.

Butane
Butane offers a relatively simple and inexpensive method to extract a large percentage of THC and other desirable compounds from cannabis plants. But it has been the subject of much controversy when it comes to what is considered a safe amount. Some naysayers argue that long-term consumption of butane by ingestion or vaporization has not been studied widely enough to confidently say it’s safe at any level.
Regulators appear to disagree and in many regions, butane is allowed at the seemingly high level of 5,000 ppm. However, illegal products could contain much higher levels.

How Much Butane in BHO Is Too Much?
So what harm can it do? According to studies, at high enough levels, butane inhalation can cause cardiac damage and organ failure, among other serious negative effects. While these risks are associated with direct inhalation of the solvent rather than practices such as dabbing, the latter may be harmful to health.
A 2019 study investigating an 18-year-old’s lung injury that resulted from frequent and prolonged inhalation of butane hash oil found: “There is a likely probability that a high level of inhaled butane also contributed to her symptoms.”
It should be noted that in this case, the patient confirmed that the butane hash oil was purchased illegally. This indicates that the product contained an unknown level of butane which could have been well above what should be allowed in a regulated product.

Ethanol
In California, the maximum level of ethanol allowed is 1,000 ppm for medical cannabis goods meant for inhalation and 5,000 ppm for other medical cannabis-infused goods. Ingesting ethanol in these small amounts is unlikely to cause harm, even over a prolonged period.
However, according to this 2018 report (involving multiple studies conducted on animal or human subjects), ethanol inhalation could be more risky, potentially causing cravings, tolerance, and dependence. That said, studies tend to examine levels of ethanol exposure far higher than you would ever find in vape oil.

Other solvents
Some other potentially harmful solvents end up in cannabis products because they are contaminants of the main Class 3 solvents used in extraction or because they are used to clean equipment used in the production process.
Here are a few that may find their way into a final product:
Benzene: This is a known carcinogen that affects bone marrow. It is allowed, albeit at very low levels, in some cannabis products.
Xylenes: In vaporized form, xylenes can cause depression of the central nervous system. Depending on the level of exposure of these Class 2 solvents, symptoms can include nausea, headache, dizziness, and vomiting, among other symptoms.
Hexane: This Class 2 solvent can have similar effects as xylenes on the central nervous system if inhaled at high enough levels.
How to decide if a cannabis product is safe
To avoid risks associated with solvents, one option is to stick with solventless extracts such as rosin and bubble hash. But if you do go with a solvent-extracted product, the only real way to tell if it’s safe to consume is to purchase a legal, licensed, regulated product.

Regulated producers use high-quality solvents that minimize the risk of contaminants like benzene and xylenes ending up in your product. Plus, they use proper equipment to remove solvents post-processing. Finally, products are tested using rigorous methods such as headspace analysis and meet standards set by state regulators.

Original artile by  Aimee O’Driscoll for Leafly appeared here.

 

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Israeli Scientists Have Found a Way to Potentially Reduce Chemo Doses with CBD

Cannabis, Cancer and Chemotherapy

CBD could help doctors reduce doses of chemotherapy drugs for cancer patients, according to a study published in the Frontiers in Pharmacology journal.

Researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have discovered that cannabidiol (CBD) can help direct traditional chemotherapy drugs to specifically target malignant cancer cells, while ignoring healthy cells. This new method could allow doctors to cut back on patients’ doses of chemo, reducing the severity of side effects commonly associated with these medicines.

The study demonstrated that doxorubicin-mediated cell death is significantly more potent, requiring an order of magnitude lower dose, when co-applied with CBD.

In other words, low doses of doxorubicin — which would normally be ineffective at killing cancer cells — became effective when combined with CBD. This CBD-facilitated effect will minimize the off-target effect of doxorubicin and therefore will substantially reduce adverse side effects.

Researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have discovered that cannabidiol (CBD) can help direct traditional chemotherapy drugs to specifically target malignant cancer cells, while ignoring healthy cells. This new method could allow doctors to cut back on patients’ doses of chemo, reducing the severity of side effects commonly associated with these medicines.

fphar-10-01198
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“Selling dagga related products online is illegal” -SAPS

SAPS have issued a stern warning that the establishment of illegal dispensaries/outlets, online sites and social media platforms which are marketing and selling cannabis and cannabis-related products to the public remains illegal, except where specifically allowed in terms of the Medicines and Related Substances Act.

Some of these illegal businesses, purporting to be operating legally in terms of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act (No. 22 of 2007), are also being sold to members of the public as franchises authorized to deal with cannabis and cannabis-related products. In terms of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act, the definition of ‘traditional medicine’ means an object or substance used in traditional health practice for the diagnosis, treatment or prevention of a physical or mental illness or any curative or therapeutic purpose, including the maintenance or restoration of physical or mental health or well-being in human beings but does not include a dependence-producing or dangerous substance or drug.

As a result, the Traditional Health Practitioners Act does not create a mechanism to sell cannabis and cannabis-related products that are not exempted in terms of the Medicines Act.

The public is once again reminded of the effect of the Constitutional Court judgment handed down on 18 September 2018.

The effect of the judgment is that only an adult person (18 years and older) may use, possess or cultivate cannabis in private for his or her personal consumption in private. The use, including smoking, of cannabis in public or in the presence of children or in the presence of non-consenting adult persons is not allowed. The use or possession of cannabis in private other than by an adult for his or her personal consumption is also not permitted.

Dealing in cannabis remains a serious criminal offense in terms of the Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act (No 140 of 199)2. The definition of dealing is made very clear in the Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act, which currently reads (with the words “read in” by the Constitutional Court): “in relation to a drug, includes performing any act in connection with the transshipment, importation, cultivation other than the cultivation of cannabis by an adult in a private place for his or her personal consumption in private, collection, manufacture, supply, prescription, administration, sale, transmission or exportation of the drug”.

Cannabis (the whole plant or parts or products thereof) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (the psychoactive substance that gives one a “high”) are currently listed as Schedule 7 substances in terms of the Medicines and Related Substances Act, 1965 (Act 101 of 1965) (the Medicines Act), except when present in processed hemp fibre and products containing not more than 0,1 % of THC in a form not suitable for ingestion, smoking or inhaling purposes; or when present in processed products made from cannabis seed containing not more than 0,001 % of THC; or when used for medicinal purposes.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is listed as a Schedule 4 substance. Certain CBD-containing preparations have been excluded from the operation of the Schedules by the Minister of Health for a time-limited period, as per an exclusion notice (R.756) published in Government Gazette No. 42477 on 23 May 2019.

CBD-containing preparations for medicinal use are excluded when they contain a maximum daily dose of 20 mg of CBD with an accepted low-risk claim or health claims, without referring to any specific disease.

CBD-containing processed products are also excluded when the naturally occurring quantity of CBD and THC contained in the product does not exceed 0, 0075 % and 0,001 %, of CBD and THC respectively.

Any CBD-containing products that are outside the parameters of the exclusion notice are subject to the provisions of the Schedules and registration as a medicine.

Any person who imports or manufactures a CBD-containing medicine in accordance with the exclusion notice must still be in possession of a license issued in terms of section 22C(1)(b) of the Medicines Act and comply with any relevant standards, including current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) standards. Such persons must be able to present verified assessment by an accredited laboratory of the CBD and/or THC content of any product or medicine when requested.

The South African Police Service is mandated to and will act, not only against businesses that sell cannabis illegally but also against the customers who buy these products.

Members of the public are encouraged to download the MySAPSApp on any iPhone or android to have easy access to the police to, among others, provide tip-offs or one may to report any information relating to the sale of cannabis to the SAPS through the SAPS Crime Stop number 086 00 10111. Callers may remain anonymous and all information will be treated in the strictest confidence.

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UNCANNI – South Africa

At Uncanni we are avid supporters of the marijuana industry and have a tremendous passion for
helping both people and animals feel their very best. We are 100% committed to offering
people the best quality certified CBD products, cannabis growing equipment, smoking
accessories, and everything else cannabis related. It has been an absolute pleasure to help
people set up and grow their own cannabis plants, and we have made so many wonderful
friends along the journey!

Our physical shop is located in Fish Hoek, Cape Town, but through our website
www.Uncanni.co.za we are able to help customers all over South Africa find exactly what they
are looking for! The CBD oils we stock are the very finest certified products from around the
globe so you can be guaranteed peace of mind. In addition to oils, we carry CBD coffees, teas,
creams, body care, lollys and much much more!

We have recently returned from a trip to the USA to source our own supply of pure, full
spectrum and organic CBD concentrate directly from a farm in Vermont. Our oils will be
produced and manufactured locally in South Africa, with high quality organic carrier oils, and
various indiginous oils for added health benefits. We are proud to offer USA quality CBD while
still supporting local South African workers! And the best part…. Because we have sourced it
directly from the farm and imported it directly with no middlemen our prices will be unbeatable!
You can get the highest quality oils available anywhere in the world at a fraction of the cost of
other imported oils. The Uncanni line of full spectrum organic CBD oils will have several
concentration levels, and oils for sleep, kids, and pets! And of course we provide a full 3rd party
lab certificate to guarantee quality, concentration, and the full cannabinoid profile. You will know
EXACTLY what you are getting when you buy our oils.

Also while in the US we were able to secure agreements to start bringing a few very exciting
products that will soon be for sale in South Africa brought in exclusively by Uncanni. Hempzilla
is one of the best known brands in the States, and is sold at over 26,000 retailers nationwide.
They have a wide selection of oils, creams, vape cartridges, vape liquids, gummies, and even
lip balm. Keep an eye out for these products to land on shelves near you soon!

Our next exciting partnership is with the Stanley Brothers who are the founders of one of the
best known cannabis companies in the world, Charlotte’s Web. You might be familiar with this
company from the documentary ‘WEED’ which featured the story of young Charlotte Figi who
was suffering from debilitating seizures and had run out of treatment options until she was
introduced to this amazing oil from the company now called Charlotte’s Web. It is definitely one
of the most well known and trusted brands in the US, and it is coming to South Africa! Be on the
lookout, or contact us directly to order.

If you prefer to grow your own medicine, Uncanni has you covered there as well! We have
anything you would ever need to grow your own including soils, a full range of nutrients, tents,
lights, pots, extraction requirements, and accessories. Whether you are a soil, coco, or
hydroponic grower, you can get anything you need here! Our staff is extremely knowledgeable
and would love to answer any questions you have about your set up or plants. We have
numerous free growing workshop scheduled at the shop, so if you want to learn to grow please
come for some fun! Don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have anything you need help with.

Our door and inbox are always open for our CannaFam!
What Cannabis shop would be complete without the smoking section!? Our vape selection both
in the shop and online is extensive and has something for everyone! In addition to offering
disposable flavoured CBD vapes we also have dry herb vapes, concentrate vapes, and table
top vapes. If you need a vape, we have you covered! If you prefer to go more old school, we
have rolling papers, pipes, bongs, dab rigs, accessories and tools, and even Piecemaker the
leading colourful silicone smoking accessories. They are medical grade silicone and the best
part…. They can get cleaned in the dishwasher when needed!
Not only does Uncanni strive to be a household name synonymous with quality, but we love to
get involved with and help our community! In just the past few months we have collected
donations for the local homeless shelter, we are a drop off point for pet food donations, and we
are proud to be part of the #ComeIn program. Our doors are always open to anyone that needs
a safe place to wait for a ride, get away from someone, or to just get out of the weather. In the
coming months we have some HUGE community outreach programs scheduled from beach
cleanups, to township litter collection, and donations of care packages for rape victims. Keep
an eye on our social media platforms for announcements on how you can get involved!
Our ultimate goal at Uncanni is to offer the best service possible with free advice anytime and a
huge smile! We are constantly looking to expand on our range of products to keep our awesome
customers happy and to keep pushing this industry forward. You can rest assured that if we sell
it in our shop it is high quality at the best possible price!
Be sure to like and follow us on Facebook and Instagram for updates and giveaways, as well as
check out www.uncanni.co.za for anything you may require! And keep checking back…. We are
constantly adding new and exciting products. We hope to meet you soon!
Cheers,

The Uncanni Team
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USDA’s 161-page draft hemp regulation rule set to be announced today.

Latest Hemp News from around the world.

NOTE: This document is a draft version of the interim final rule provided as a courtesy. The official publication of the interim final rule in the Federal Register may include changes from this version. The effective date of the interim final rule is, and the comment period will not begin until, the date of publication in the Federal Register.

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